The 25 Top Consultants at 2007
08/08/2007
In many ways, this year’s Top 25 Consultants are a microcosm of the profession and the marketplace. Much like today’s consulting industry, there’s really no easy way to define the Top 25 in terms of specialty, methodology, firm size or business model. Gone are the days of the cookie-cutter consultancy. As the pace of business and industry continues to accelerate, staying ahead of client needs becomes a more difficult challenge. These Top 25 Consultants are doing their part to push the profession to higher places in an ever-expanding global economy. The Top 25 is a snapshot of all that’s right in consulting. It is made of up CEOs, vice presidents, partners, chief strategy officers, chief talent officers and innovation leaders. Reflecting today’s business marketplace, it’s a more international group than in previous years and, as such more than half of this year’s list has global responsibilities. The group is also more inclusive than in previous years; the 22 firms represented are the most since the Top 25 Consultants launched eight years ago. (Consultants apprear in alphabetical order):

(Consultants apprear in alphabetical order): 

Romil Bahl Infosys Consulting  Romil Bahl
 Infosys Consulting

Shahzad Bashir Huron Consulting Group  Shahzad Bashir
 Huron Consulting
 Group

    
Tamra Chandler Hitachi Consulting  Tamra Chandler
 Hitachi Consulting

Nicholas Evans Unisys CorporationNicholas Evans
Unisys Corporation

    
Mark Gerencser Booz Allen HamiltonMark Gerencser
Booz Allen Hamilton

Steven Gunby Boston Consulting GroupSteven Gunby
Boston Consulting Group

     

Dan Haas Bain & CompanyDan Haas
Bain & Company

     

Russ Hagey Bain & CompanyRuss Hagey
Bain & Company

     

Alan Herrick SapientAlan Herrick
Sapient

     

Ray Hill IMS HealthRay Hill
IMS Health

Steven Hill KPMG Advisory PracticeSteven Hill
KPMG Advisory Practice

    

Debra Cammer Hines IBM Global Business ServicesDebra Cammer Hines
IBM Global Business Services

     

Janet Hoffman AccentureJanet Hoffman
Accenture

     

Paul Laudicina A.T. KearneyPaul Laudicina
A.T. Kearney

    

Sharon Marcil Boston Consulting GroupSharon Marcil
Boston Consulting Group

    

Michael Moorman ZS AssociatesMichael Moorman
ZS Associates

    

Walter Mullikin CSCWalter Mullikin
CSC

    

Salil Parekh CapgeminiSalil Parekh
Capgemini

    

Kris Pederson IBM Global Business ServicesKris Pederson
IBM Global Business Services

     

Venguswamy Ramaswamy Tata Consultancy ServicesVenguswamy Ramaswamy
Tata Consulting Services

Punit Renjen Deloittle ConsultingPunit Renjen
Deloitte Consulting

    

David Schuette BusinessEdge SolutionsDavid Schuette
BusinessEdge Solutions

    

Gary Smith Ivy Planning GroupGary Smith
Ivy Planning Group

    

Davide Taliente Oliver WymanDavide Taliente
Oliver Wyman

    
Rolf Thrane Mitchell Madison GroupRolf Thrane
Mitchell Madison Group

 

Paul Laudicina - A.T. Kearney

By Joe Kornik Rating:

Paul Laudicina - A.T. KearneyWhen discussing the future of A.T. Kearney, Paul Laudicina, managing officer and chairman of the board for the Chicago-based firm, likes to talk about the past. “Right now, we’re spending a lot of time refashioning the future of A.T. Kearney based on upon our rich and historical past,” Laudicina says. “We’re fortunate to be one of the few consulting companies that has a very long legacy that helped establish the science of management consulting.”

 

Alan Herrick - Sapient

By Alan Radding Rating:
Alan Herrick - SapientIn 2000, Forrester Research anointed Sapient the top e-business consultancy. Then the dot-com mania collapsed. “So we were number one in a defunct category,” recalls Alan Herrick, president and CEO of Cambridge, Mass.-based Sapient. The firm then set about re-inventing itself in a second act. Last year, Sapient posted a 29 percent increase in annual revenue, and today, more than half of its 5,000 people are based in India.

Kris Pederson - IBM Global Business Services

By Jacqueline Durett Rting:
Kris Pederson - IBM Global Business ServicesKris Pederson fashions herself a “business doctor.” And it’s an apt title, as Pederson, vice president and partner of IBM Global Business Services, started her undergrad education in a pre-med program at UCLA. “From about five, I wanted to be a doctor,” she says. However, she quickly found that the softer skills involved with medicine were much more compelling, and she used that interest to go into business and get her MBA from Harvard Business School. But she still sees the parallels in her initial career choice and her role at IBM. “Instead of physical pain, you’re sorting out business pain.”

Rolf Thrane - Mitchell Madison Group

By Joe Kornik | Published 07/25/2007 | Rating:
Rolf Thrane - Mitchell Madison GroupIn a market where hundreds of consulting firms compete for the same clients, Rolf Thrane, CEO of New York’s Mitchell Madison Group, decided to set his firm apart from the rest. In 2003, Thrane decided to offer clients an unconventional proposition: demonstrate his firm’s commitment to achieve a performance objective by sharing in the cost, risks and benefits.

 

Russ Hagey - Bain & Company

By Eric Krell  Rating:
Russ Hagey - Bain & CompanyExecutives responsible for developing talent at consulting firms tend to concentrate on cultivating analytical and relationship-management skills during the early stages of their consultants’ growth.


By Eric Krell Rating:
Steven Hill - KPMG Advisory PracticeWhen discussing his possible return to KPMG in 2003, Steven Hill asked why the firm wanted him back. The question was a good one. After all, the Sarbanes-Oxley compliance wave was surging at the time - so why would KPMG need a Bearing Point senior vice president and former McKinsey consultant whose pedigree consisted of value creation?

 
By Eric Krell Rating:
Janet Hoffman - AccentureJanet Hoffman doesn’t quite sound like a consultant. That may have something to do with the frequency and ease with which she laughs. After a decade in the profession and two years leading Accenture’s retail practice, Hoffman insists she hasn’t stopped having fun. That’s not to say consultants as a lot aren’t fun-loving folks; it’s just that Hoffman’s heartfelt interest in retail - from grocery stores to mass-market retailers to apparel to quick-serve restaurants and many other of the industry’s sectors - resonates in happy bursts.
By Stacy Collett  Rating:
Gary Smith - Ivy Planning GroupToday’s workforce is more highly diverse than ever before. With more college graduates seeking jobs and a growing number of seniors staying on the job longer, the employee landscape now spans four generations. What’s more, 85 percent of new entrants to the workforce are women and people of color.
By Joe Kornik Rating:
Romil Bahl - Infosys ConsultingWhile all consulting firms may claim to be a unique proposition, Infosys Consulting does things a bit differently. The Fremont, Calif.-based firm certainly doesn’t act like a traditional consulting firm, and Romil Bahl, the managing director of Infosys Consulting, likes it that way.


 
By Stacy Collett  Rating:
Venguswamy Ramaswamy - Tata Consultancy ServicesTata Consultancy Services in Mumbai, India, has grown into an offshore outsourcing powerhouse by attracting and keeping high-level, powerhouse clients such as General Electric and American Express.
 
 
 
 
By Eric Krell| Rating:
Debra Cammer Hines IBM Global Business ServicesTwo years after IBM’s acquisition of PwC Consulting, Debra Cammer Hines realized that something didn’t quite add up in the public service financial management practice. “Some of the folks who joined the company from PwC Consulting still were unsure of what it meant to be a financial management consultant in IBM,” Cammer Hines recalls.
 
 
By Alan Radding Rating:
Salil Parekh CapgeminiNo doubt the turnaround Salil Parekh, executive chairman, Capgemini India, engineered in his previous position as CEO of Capgemini North America was impressive. With Parekh at the helm, the operation went from a $100 million loss in 2004 to a break-even business in 2005, and recorded a $100 million profit in 2006. “We had the benefit of an improving economy,” he notes, but cost-cutting and the refocusing of the operation’s efforts were what made it possible.
 
 
By Stacy Collett  Rating:
Davide Taliente Oliver WymanAs a young consultant in 1989, Davide Taliente was intrigued by “the curious and dynamic environment” of investment banking. At the London-based Oliver Wyman, Taliente has found a perfect fit for his passion for financial services and consulting. As managing director and head of Oliver Wyman’s EMEA region, Taliente has helped build the boutique firm into an international financial services consulting powerhouse that helps clients address the industry’s top concerns - consolidation, regulation and capturing market share.
 
 
By Alan Radding Rating:

Mark Gerencser Booz Allen HamiltonMark Gerencser, senior vice president at McLean, Va.-based Booz Allen Hamilton, insists that “serving clients really is my passion,” although you couldn’t be faulted, judging from his résumé, if you thought that sitting in committee meetings was his true calling.

 

By Stacy Collett  Rating:
Michael Moorman ZA AssociatesWhat do careers in aerospace engineering and consulting have in common?  Michael Moorman says they both require analytical and problem-solving capabilities. As an engineer for NASA and Rockwell International in the 1980s, Moorman mastered those abilities, but he was looking for a new challenge that would tap into his people skills. “Consulting seemed perfect for that,” he says.

 

» Sharon Marcil - Boston Consulting Group

By Eric Krell  Rating:

Sharon Marcil - Boston Consulting GroupWhen Boston Consulting Group Chairman of the Americas Steven Gunby (see Top 25, page 34) asked Senior Partner Sharon Marcil to reinvigorate the firm’s recruitment, development and retention of women, she responded instinctively. “I did a rigorous diagnosis in conjunction with [Gunby] and our CEO, and we discovered the core issues and the core opportunities on the recruiting and retention side,” Marcil explains. “Once we understood that, we developed a very strong implementation plan to drive the changes through the line.”

Nicholas Evans - Unisys Corporation

By Joe Kornik  Rating:

Nicholas Evans - Unisys CorporationNicholas Evans, vice president and general manager of the CTO Office at Unisys Corporation, carries another title that describes what he does a little better - Innovation Lead. Even though innovation is one of today’s buzzwords, Evans has spent his entire 20-year career searching for and identifying emerging trends and innovative technologies for clients.

Punit Renjen - Deloitte Consulting

By Alan Radding  Rating:

Punit Renjen - Deloitte ConsultingDuring the 1990s M&A fell out of favor, when books like Barbarians at the Gate by Brian Burrough and John Helyar, which chronicled the RJR-Nabisco merger, were hitting the best-seller lists.

Shahzad Bashir - Huron Consulting Group

By Alan Radding  Rating:

Shahzad Bashir - Huron Consulting GroupShahzad Bashir, vice president for legal operational consulting at Huron Consulting Group, just might have some issues separating business life from his personal life - even at an NBA playoff game. Bashir had his BlackBerry on and handled e-mails throughout Game 7 between the Houston Rockets and Utah Jazz. “Years ago I realized I could never really balance personal and professional life.” At best, he concludes, “you have to manage the imbalance.”

Walter Mullikin - CSC

By Stacy Collett  Rating:

Walter Mullikin - CSCThe human brain is very much like a complex organization, says Walter Mullikin. To survive, both require sensory input, instantaneous processing, decision-making skills and feedback controls. Mullikin has been applying those principles - learned as a scientist doing brain research at the University of Pennsylvania - in his current role as a partner at Philadelphia-based CSC, where he is considered one of the firm’s leading visionaries in science and technology.

» Dan Haas - Bain & Company
By Eric Krell | Published 07/25/2007  | Rating:
Dan Haas - Bain & CompanyIt’s impossible to crack the business pages today without seeing a story on a public company’s acquisition by a private equity firm. Peer deeper into those deals and there’s an even chance you’ll spot the helping hand of Bain & Company’s private equity practice.
» Tamra Chandler - Hitachi Consulting
By Alan Radding | Published 07/25/2007 | Rating:
Tamra Chandler - Hitachi ConsultingTamra Chandler, managing vice president of global solutions and people at Hitachi Consulting, started her professional life as an engineer at Boeing, but when she got to consulting she quickly was attracted to the people side of the business. For a people person like Chandler, Dallas-based Hitachi Consulting, a product of six consulting firms merged together, offered an irresistible challenge of building a unified culture. “Here were a bunch of great people who came from different places. I saw this as a great opportunity,” she says.
» David Schuette - BusinessEdge Solutions
By Alan Radding | Published 07/25/2007 | Rating:
David Schuette BusinessEdge SolutionsDavid Schuette tried to leave his sales job at IBM on several occasions, but each time his manager refused to accept his resignation. His manager would tell him that the Dallas Cowboys would never trade their back-up quarterback, a role he felt Schuette fit perfectly. Then a funny thing happened. The Cowboys did trade their back-up quarterback and Schuette clipped the headline, fired it off to his manager along with his latest resignation letter, and left on a path that eventually took him to where he is today, chief strategy officer at BusinessEdge Solutions.
» Ray Hill - IMS Health
By Joe Kornik | Published 07/25/2007 | Unrated
Ray Hill IMS HealthRay Hill isn’t shy about taking on the big boys. As general manger for IMS Health, Ray Hill oversees the global management consulting business at IMS Health, a publicly traded $2 billion company. Its advisory arm, IMS Health Consulting, is a relatively new player in the pharmaceutical consulting space, but Hill has some pretty lofty ambitions about the firm.
» Steven Gunby - Boston Consulting Group
By Eric Krell | Published 07/25/2007 | Rating:
Steven Gunby Boston Consulting GroupWhat does a key leader at one of the world’s top strategy consultancies mention first when describing his firm’s success? No, it’s not strategy. “If you have a major change inside any institution, insight alone doesn’t make it happen,” says Steven Gunby, a 23-year veteran of Boston Consulting Group. People also matter.
By Eric Krell | Published 07/25/2007 | Rating:
Debra Cammer Hines IBM Global Business ServicesTwo years after IBM’s acquisition of PwC Consulting, Debra Cammer Hines realized that something didn’t quite add up in the public service financial management practice. “Some of the folks who joined the company from PwC Consulting still were unsure of what it meant to be a financial management consultant in IBM,” Cammer Hines recalls.
By Alan Radding | Published 07/25/2007  Rating:
Salil Parekh CapgeminiNo doubt the turnaround Salil Parekh, executive chairman, Capgemini India, engineered in his previous position as CEO of Capgemini North America was impressive. With Parekh at the helm, the operation went from a $100 million loss in 2004 to a break-even business in 2005, and recorded a $100 million profit in 2006. “We had the benefit of an improving economy,” he notes, but cost-cutting and the refocusing of the operation’s efforts were what made it possible.
By Stacy Collett | Published 07/25/2007 | Rating:
Davide Taliente Oliver WymanAs a young consultant in 1989, Davide Taliente was intrigued by “the curious and dynamic environment” of investment banking. At the London-based Oliver Wyman, Taliente has found a perfect fit for his passion for financial services and consulting. As managing director and head of Oliver Wyman’s EMEA region, Taliente has helped build the boutique firm into an international financial services consulting powerhouse that helps clients address the industry’s top concerns - consolidation, regulation and capturing market share.
By Alan Radding | Published 07/25/2007  | Rating:
Mark Gerencser Booz Allen HamiltonMark Gerencser, senior vice president at McLean, Va.-based Booz Allen Hamilton, insists that “serving clients really is my passion,” although you couldn’t be faulted, judging from his résumé, if you thought that sitting in committee meetings was his true calling.
By Stacy Collett | Published 07/25/2007  | Rating:
Michael Moorman ZA AssociatesWhat do careers in aerospace engineering and consulting have in common?  Michael Moorman says they both require analytical and problem-solving capabilities. As an engineer for NASA and Rockwell International in the 1980s, Moorman mastered those abilities, but he was looking for a new challenge that would tap into his people skills. “Consulting seemed perfect for that,” he says.